challenging behavior

challenging behavior

  • Solving Conflicts

    Solving Conflicts

             Minor conflicts are a natural and inevitable part of social relationships. Our goal is not to get rid of conflict completely, but rather to create a safe environment in which children learn how to manage and resolve minor clashes, arguments, and disagreements. As teachers, we have a choice how to intervene. Read More

  • The Problem with Time Out

    The Problem with Time Out

    In the past, Time Out was often advocated as a humane strategy to guide children’s behavior. When children “misbehave,” they are sent to a chair or other location that was separate from the group and quiet. Children are often admonished to “think about what you did” while in time out, and teachers typically control the amount of time spent isolated. Read More

  • Avoiding Shame

    Avoiding Shame

        As humans, we all need to learn how to live in social communities and we need to feel badly when we do things that are wrong and hurt others. However, there is a big difference between feeling guilty and feeling shame.     Guilt tells us that our actions were inappropriate. Read More

  • Friday Reflection….

    Friday Reflection….

    If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.
    If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.
    If a child doesn’t know how to multiple, we teach.
    If a child doesn’t know how to spell, we teach.
    If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we…..teach?….. Read More

  • The Butterfly Circus: Come Out of Your Cocoon and Fly High

    The Butterfly Circus: Come Out of Your Cocoon and Fly High

    Young children with challenging behaviors quickly begin to see themselves as troublemakers, or “bad” kids and they can often see no alternative to this role. As teachers of young children, we can help our students see themselves through different lenses, allowing them to transform into the butterflies they were meant to be. Read More

  • Acting Out Cycle: Part III

    Acting Out Cycle: Part III

         So far, we have looked at triggers, agitation, and acceleration in children’s acting out cycle.  With careful observation and skills, we will never have to experience the Peak Phase of the cycle. Our goal should always be prevention. However, many children move rapidly through the cycle and we might be unable to intervene quickly enough. Read More

  • Acting Out Cycle: Part II

    Acting Out Cycle: Part II

         In the previous post, I introduced the idea of the acting out cycle from the IRIS Center. An understanding of the acting out cycle is helpful to teachers in order to prevent triggers of challenging behaviors and to calm children down quickly when they begin to show signs of agitation. Read More

  • Acting Out Cycle

    Acting Out Cycle

      It may often seem that children’s tantrums, hitting, fighting, or other challenging behaviors come out of nowhere. In actuality, there is a cycle that children go through when they act out and this can be predictable. Sometimes, it just happens so quickly it may be hard to recognize. Understanding this cycle helps us to know how to intervene and when. Read More

  • Teaching Children to Get Positive Attention

    Teaching Children to Get Positive Attention

    What’s the difference between the children who are a joy to have in class and the children who push our buttons and challenge our last bit of patience? One important difference is that some children have learned how to get adults’ attention in positive ways and others haven’t. Read More